Alliance for Saving Threatened Forests

 

 

 

Help us locate a "survivor" hemlock or Fraser fir! If you know of a healthy
hemlock or Fraser fir that has not been treated with insecticide,
please let us know about it by going to the "Locate" below.

New and Improved!!! Please take a look at our About Us page to see our mission, vision and strategies.

ASTF FEATURED IN THE MEDIA!
What's eating our evergreen trees?-WHYY's The Pulse
Look What’s Killing Our Oldest Trees-Quest
Tiny Woolly Terrors: The Attack of the Adelgid-SciStarter Blog

Congratulations to Dr. Dick Casagrande of the University of Rhode Island on being the recipient of the 2014 L.O. Howard Distinguished Achievement Award!

2013 ANNUAL REPORT
We have made substantial progress toward identifying and developing resistance to adelgids in hemlocks and firs, despite a number of difficulties encountered.  Our preferred strategy for producing resistance is to identify and exploit resistance in the native species.  The effort to locate those resistant genotypes needed has centered around generating leads through targeted brochures, our website, and education through interaction with natural resources professionals and the public. Read more about it here>>>

ASTF 2013 Symposium!
The Symposium was held October 29th and 30th in the Education Center at the North Carolina Arboretum in Asheville. If you were unable to attend the symposium a pdf of the abstracts from the talks is available here.

The Alliance has new partners!
See our partners page to get a full list of our partners and links to their websites.

Representatives of the Alliance are available for speaking engagements with your group or organization. Please contact Fred Hain at Fred_Hain@ncsu.edu for additional information.

Press release on the Tiny Terrors project!
Read it here!

Check out our latest article on recent hemlock population genetics and ASTF work highlighted in the Smoky Mountain News!
Nice article in the Smoky Mountain News about the importance of the Mountain Research Station that also highlights the work of the ASTF. Read it here!
Read about hemlock population genetics here!

The Tiny Terrors Project
WE NEED YOUR HELP! Adelgids, invasive insects barely visible to the naked eye, are sweeping through our forests and killing hemlock and Fraser fir trees. Read more about it here>>>

Help us locate a "survivor" Hemlock or Fraser fir tree!
If you know of a healthy hemlock or Fraser fir tree that has not been treated with insecticide, please let us know about it by going to the "Locate" button on the far right of the top menu bar.

New American Forest Foundation Blog Post on Woolly Adelgid

Read Erin Mester's article about the "Silent Killer" on the American Forest Foundation Blog and on the AFF Facebook page.

Reclaiming Hemlocks and Firs: A Symposium

If you did not have the opportunity to attend the symposium, an archived webcast is available here.

Fred Hain Receives Order of the Longleaf Pine

ASTF director Fred Hain received the Order of the Longleaf Pine in October. Read the story here.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on Public Radio

Listen to stories about the hemlock woolly adelgid on Western NC Public Radio. Click here to go to the segments for the first story, and here to go to the second.

Research on Invasive Forest Pests

In the early to mid-1900s two small insect pests entered the United States and began devouring evergreen forests in the eastern North America. From the 1950s until today, both the balsam woolly adelgid and the hemlock woolly adelgid have left trails of tree “ghosts” in the Appalachians and elsewhere.

The balsam woolly adelgid has nearly eliminated older Fraser firs, and the hemlock woolly adelgid is even more devastating to eastern and Carolina hemlock forests, leaving giant holes in the landscape as trees die off...
Read More >>

Alliance for Saving Threatened Forests

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